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Asian Tribune is published by World Institute For Asian Studies|Powered by WIAS Vol. 12 No. 2063

Life & Health

Reality check: How are countries taking care of their ageing populations?

As fertility rates decline and life expectancy increases, the proportion of people aged 60 and above is growing globally. Global average life expectancy has increased from 48 years in 1950 to 68 years in 2010 and is expected to become 81 years by the end of the century.

Reality check: How are countries taking care of their ageing populations?
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For age is opportunity no less than youth itself...

The erosion of traditional livelihoods and family support, along with weak health systems, is simply increasing their vulnerability. Old age means different things to different people. The quality of the sunset years is influenced by factors like economic security, social support, literacy, gender and one's own mindset and thinking. While, as the modern saying goes, life might be beginning at 60-65 for some, for many it starts fading painfully at this juncture.

Photograph of 88 years old Mrs Mua
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Simulated patient study sheds new light on antibiotic use in India

Overuse and/or misuse of antibiotics has led to antimicrobial resistant superbugs pose a global health emergency. This threat is particularly great in India, that has the highest burden of TB in the world and is also the world’s largest consumer of antibiotics. In a first of its kind study, led by Dr Srinath Satyanarayana of McGill University, and published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, researchers used standardized patients (also called ‘simulated or mystery patients’) to understand how pharmacies in 3 Indian cities treated patients presenting with TB symptoms or diagnoses and to determine whether these pharmacies were contributing to the inappropriate use of antibiotics.

Simulated patient study sheds new light on antibiotic use in India
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Michael R. Bloomberg - WHO’s Global Ambassador for Non-communicable Disease

The World Health Organization has appointed Michael R. Bloomberg as the WHO Global Ambassador for Non-communicable Disease (NCDs).

Michael R. Bloomberg  -  WHO’s Global Ambassador for Non-communicable Disease
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Frontline voices: To be a transgender living with HIV in India

Armed with a management degree in marketing, Amruta Soni is currently working in Patna as the state programme manager at National Coalition of PLHIV in India (NCPI) for the Vihaan project in Bihar. Today she confidently handles 15 partner NGOs, providing them with technical support on how to implement the programme and link people living with HIV (PLHIV) with Vihaan care and support centres.

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Oral cancer attributable to betel chewing with tobacco leaves and areca nuts - Dr. Prasanna Jayasekera

In Sri Lanka of the cancers prevalent among males, a quarter is oral cancer which is attributable to betel chewing with tobacco leaves and areca nuts, says Dr. Prasanna Jayasekera, Consultant in Community Dentistry of the National Cancer Control Program.

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E-waste likely to affect human health

"E-waste can give rise to a number of toxic by-products while the hazardous components are processed. They are likely to affect human health".

Be a change Maker Award Ceremony on E-waste Management
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The World Hepatitis Day was commemorated on 28 July

The World Health Organization (WHO) encourages countries to act now to reduce deaths from viral hepatitis.
WHO urges countries to take rapid action to improve knowledge about the disease, and to increase access to testing and treatment services.

The World Hepatitis Day was commemorated on 28 July
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Sri Lanka No: 1 in the prevalence of oral cancer in the South - Professor W.M. Thilakaratne.

Sri Lanka is in the first place of oral cancer prevalence in South, says the Dean of Dental Faculty of the University of Peradeniya, Professor W.M. Thilakaratne.

Professor W.M. Thilakaratne.
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We cannot eliminate TB if we leave children behind

"Children are central to where we are heading for in TB control. If we aim to end TB in the next 20 years we should know the trends in infection and disease in the paediatric population and amend it," said Dr Jennifer Furin of Harvard Medical School, at a session in International TB Conference (TB 2016) - a two-day conference dedicated exclusively to this infectious disease - that immediately preceded the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) being currently held in port city of Durban. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that nearly 1 million children get infected with TB and more than 30,000 children become sick every year with multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB).

We cannot eliminate TB if we leave children behind
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